Home Forums Silicon Valley Study Tour – 20-26 August 2017 Torino Silicon Valley 2017

221 replies, 26 voices Last updated by Marta Pancaldi 3 years, 4 months ago
  • Carlos
    Participant
    @carlosfilho
    #869

    @Riccardo i agree with you. There will be less jobs created than lost, but the problem will noot be this. I think the problem is that if people don’t keep studying and improving themselves, they will become obsolete… Like the jobs that will be extinguished by new machinery. There will be the creation of new specialized jobs, but if the people that are “at risk” doesn’t start improving their skills, when the time come, they will lose their job for sure, and it will also be more difficult to find any new job if that was the only thing they could do…

    I also agree with you about big data… This is also a use that i think didn’t came out before on our previous conversation… Use big data to analyse the will of working abroad…

    Stefano Pistillo
    Participant
    @pistillostefano
    #872

    Hi everyone,

    This is Stefano and I’m going to speak on Monday about my experience with the SVST to the US and back.

    I read your comments and I just wanted to give 3 links about Big Data to anyone who might be interested to delve a little bit more into the subject:

    This Is How Facebook Actually Won Trump the Presidency

    Trump’s Data Team Saw a Different America—and They Were Right

    This is a great Facebook group about people working with Data daily:

    Dataninja

    Enjoy!

    Stefano

    Riccardo Ferrero Regis
    Participant
    @foreversin
    #873

    Thank you @pisitillostefano, i think you posted the same link twice!

    This sound be the second one :

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-11-10/trump-s-data-team-saw-a-different-america-and-they-were-right

    Leonardo Falcioni
    Participant
    @leonardo
    #874

    @pistillostefano I  read the first article you linked and it’s very interesting. The decision to use mostly social media for a campaign shows just how much internet has grown in the last few years, becoming a powerful tool.

    About the second article, I think you posted it twice, since it’s redirecting me to the same page.

    Thanks for the Facebook page, I’ll check that out after lessons are over

    Stefano Pistillo
    Participant
    @pistillostefano
    #875

    @foreversin That’s right, thanks!

    Leonardo Falcioni
    Participant
    @leonardo
    #876

    @foreversin Yeah, sorry. Didn’t notice you already wrote that.

    Filippo Galli
    Participant
    @filippogalli
    #877

    These articles on the US president and his use of digital advertising (and hence big data for personalized ads) are really interesting, and sure are part of a broader discussion on how most of the american presidents that overturned the results of an election were those who were smarter in adopting new medias and using them properly: Lincoln with the telegraph, Roosevelt with the radio, Clinton with the TV and now Trump with social media.

    Bringing the topic back to Big Data and the industry, being interested in the applications of IoT, big data and robotics in agriculture, I would like to hear from you if you are aware of any existing technology that exploits the pervasivity of computing of our days to build huge databases. Some clear examples of these applications are linked with personal data harvesting. But when it comes to environmental or biological data? One example that comes to my mind is meteorology (which in general is not an industry).

    Do you know of others?

     

    Riccardo Ferrero Regis
    Participant
    @foreversin
    #878

    I do not like to repeat myself but the drones can collect a lots of environmental data! With just a camera and some geolocalized photos you can create a 3D model of everything. Thermal imaging camera drones are also being used for thermographic inspections.

     

    More in depth look :

    http://www.rff.org/research/publications/data-drones-new-way-see-natural-world

    Filippo Galli
    Participant
    @filippogalli
    #879

    Being honest I do not fully agree with you because drones are still in an early stage of development. Three grounds to back my statement are:

    1) drones fill up a lot of article papers and researches (for example the link you shared, or my master thesis ahah) but have a hard life when it comes to the industry, with the notable exception of the film industry

    2) when they make it to reach the market/industry level, often the results are poor, even though they are often much fun (Parrot is one of the greatest drone companies, and their most performing machine flies for ~20 mins)

    3) A less technical reason: flight legislation often makes it hard for an industry to satisfy costumer demand, especially in Italy, for safety reasons.

    This is why I’d prefer ground mobile robotics for data harvesting. But I am trying to understand why there are not many companies already in the field, I am probably missing something.

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 7 months ago by Filippo Galli. Reason: Terrible formatting
    Leonardo Falcioni
    Participant
    @leonardo
    #952

    @filippogalli After some research on drones development and possible pros, I have to agree with you. But still, as @foreversin repeated, they can present an important resource in many fields.

    While looking online about your doubt of ground mobile robotics for data harvesting, despite my insuccess in finding anything important related, I came across an interesting article about data collection. Not ground data, but big data.

    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/feb/27/nsa-robots-algorithm-surveillance-bruce-schneier

    It’s interesting to notice how data collection for public security partially works through one word’s meaning.

    Filippo Galli
    Participant
    @filippogalli
    #968

    @leonardo I read the article you just posted, and I am also surprised by how easy it is to work around privacy issues by simply… changing the meaning of a term!

    On a more lightweight note, I’d like to suggest you this reading about how Netflix has taken over the market of movie streaming services by an accurate analysis of their custumer data.  Especially, I want to underline the importance of paying more attention to what the customer does, rather than what the customer says. The information contained in one user letting pass a lot of time from one episode to the following, or a user quitting a series, is way more important than the rating the same user would give to the series itself.
    We, as humans, are often biased in our judgements by many factors, but our actions reflect what we really think about something.

    https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/amazing-ways-netflix-uses-big-data-drive-success-bernard-marr

     

    Leonardo Falcioni
    Participant
    @leonardo
    #974

    @filippogalli I read the article and, being a Netflix subscriber, I was fascinated by understanding how big data is used by this company, even though I had already a general idea.

    Regarding human actions, I don’t agree with you completely. Usually humans act based not solely on what they believe or think, but on what is socially acceptable. But this is another, more complex topic that I’ll leave out of this conversation.

    Filippo Galli
    Participant
    @filippogalli
    #981

    Well, just to clarify what I mean: behavioral data are way more reliable than questionnaires/surveys when it comes to profiling costumers. In this context, social acceptance has a more prominent role in how we judge (rating a movie) rather than how we act (binge watching a series), and Netflix’ success itself is a proof of this. I remember a seminar I attended in Pasadena, CA, in which some Data Analyst (whose name I don’t remember) considered this approach a standard in the field, while analysing questionnaires is nowadays obsolete – of course when you can actually access huge amount of behavioral information.

    In other contexts, like social life, you are probably right.

    Daniel
    Participant
    @danieleallasiais
    #992

    Hi everyone! Sorry for the delay in replying to all of you but I don’t have much time during the week, I read the first article about Big Data manipulation (with all your 88 comments, damn!) and I think is not that scary (as someone wrote) and fascinating either, as IT students we should expect this kind of things and we must prepare to exploit them to our advantage. I don’t like the way their using this Facebook-like social networks to grab personal information/interests/hobbies/activities because the person behind them is not always the person you read about on his “Timeline”. I can belittle or exaggerate my feelings about something happened, write that I love Trump even if I voted Clinton.

    That said, I wanna thank Andrea and Stefano for the delightful speech of today (03/20), I wrote this because of them.

    Federico Landorno
    Participant
    @federicolandorno
    #993

    I want to focus on the debate involving the job that Andrea and Stefano talked about.
    Keeping an open mind and being able to go from one company to another are qualities that most of the Italian people do not have. I worked in a computer company where the employees (in this case several of my colleagues and superiors) wanted to leave because the environment was oppressive, but they felt obliged to stay because they had families to feed and trying to get back in the game was not an option for them.
    What do you think of these kind of situations, and how do you think they can be handled by the mentality of Silicon Valley?

    Would you rather have a stable job or a flexible one (I’m talking about changing jobs very often), and why would you choose that option?
    I have worked for two companies, without getting into specifics, then I resumed my studies and these experiences were all stimulations that led me to believe I am more suited for flexible working. As reported by the example above, one year later I left the company to change path.

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