Home Forums Silicon Valley Study Tour – 20-26 August 2017 Torino Silicon Valley 2017

221 replies, 26 voices Last updated by Marta Pancaldi 3 years, 4 months ago
  • Leonardo Falcioni
    Participant
    @leonardo
    #1033

    @foreversin I think the biggest inconvenient about having to bip is the idea of having to do it in every public transport you take. For those with the subscription csn be quite annoying to get the card out of theirs pockets every time. I count myself in thus group. But it’s an innovation nonetheless, and it will probably be upgraded in the future.

    Leonardo Falcioni
    Participant
    @leonardo
    #1034

    Seems like I can’t stop making silly mistakes today. Sorry for my bad writing.

    Riccardo Ferrero Regis
    Participant
    @foreversin
    #1035

    @leonardo Yeah i understand your point, its an already old technology but the idea is good. I have to take the train to get to turin, i take a GTT train and after May i ll have to bip when i get to the station too. Let’s hope they ll come up with a better idea!

    Gabriel Gatu
    Participant
    @gabrielgatu
    #1036

    Hello everyone! Nice to meet you all 🙂

    My name is Gabriel and I apologize for joining this group so late but I had some doubts regarding the project. Now, after today’s presentation, I’ve come to the conclusion that I have to partecipate, the great talks from Andrea and Stefano helped me realize that this is a one time chance and It would be a pity not to take this opportunity.

    But now, enough with the presentations 🙂 I’ve read the discussions you’ve gone through so far and they are very interesting, I would like to discuss some of them further:

    @carlosfilho Nice video! Really loving anything from Ted. I’ve noticed you and @foreversin were discussing about the loss of jobs and how it should be greater than the new jobs positions: this is becoming a trending topic in the 4th industrial revolution but we are all missing something very important.
    As Rainer Strack says, in 2020, with the current labor force, 4/20 countries will already be in shortage of it, meaning they will have to attract workers from other countries. In 2030 the scenario is even worse, with 17/20 countries in shortage.
    This is due the decreasing of the TFR (Total fertility rate) and the aging of the current workforce. It’s a fascinating phenomenon and although I would like to talk more about it, I don’t think this is the right place. I’ll leave here the wikipedia page which explains it very well: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Total_fertility_rate

    This is also a publication of EPSC (Europe Political Strategy Centre) making an extremely good summary of possible projections for the future and current state: http://ec.europa.eu/epsc/publications/strategic-notes/future-work_en

    @pistillostefano Regarding the use of big data I think that the Trump’s victory is a perfect example: the “A/B testing on steroids” (testing 175k variations of the same ads only on fb) allowed them to collect huge number of behavioral data, used to maximize their political influence. Vice news made a good video about that: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=29FWjeH4nUE

    It’s also incredible how fb become not only the predominant social network, but also the main information and entertainment source: the other day I was watching a video about Gigster (Roger Dickey) that was talking exactly about this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2IX024QVNG4 – really interesting person and smart entrepreneur.

    Regarding the discussion about GTT, I think that both parts have a right point: the data collected from “bipping” your card could certainly help to improve and maximize some routes, but at the same time it’s a double edged sword, because, as @carlosfilho pointed before, it could not work properly when the buses are full, invalidating and misleading some data. But I see a simple, yet effective, solution, already adopted in many countries: all the people that want to get on the bus have a specific door (eg: the one in the front) – with the bip machine just in front of them – and all the people getting out the bus have the middle and back ones. This could resolve a lot of issues from the current situation:
    – New people getting in must have the bip card or a valid ticket (the driver could check this, to ensure all the people are paying for the service, already adopted in different countries, like UK)
    – GTT will collect useful and accurate informations from Bip card
    – People getting in will find space on the bus, because the people already on the bus will be pushed continuously back

    Finally, if you made till here, I would like to propose an untouched and delicate topic, still very interesting for all of us: everyday we hear about big startups going to an IPO – Initial Public Offering – last one snapchat, with 25B$, but how and why is snapchat valued so much? And this is just one example, Uber never made a profit and a lot of other big startups have very low remuneration compared to the cost involved. In the last period the media started talking about a possible big bubble, maybe even bigger that the 2007 one, which could involve all of us.

    What do you think about it? I’ll leave here also a nice video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IS8b5hew3_g

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 7 months ago by Gabriel Gatu.
    • This reply was modified 3 years, 7 months ago by Gabriel Gatu.
    • This reply was modified 3 years, 7 months ago by Gabriel Gatu.
    • This reply was modified 3 years, 7 months ago by Gabriel Gatu.
    • This reply was modified 3 years, 7 months ago by Gabriel Gatu. Reason: resolved some formatting issues
    Lorenzo Bersano
    Participant
    @lorenzobersano
    #1042

    @foreversin thank you for the articles you posted. What I want to highlight of the first article are the concepts “keep building bridges” and “if I have nothing new to learn here, why should I continue working in this place?”. The first one is the fundamental topic that we heard from everyone that spoke at the conferences: keep relationships with people even if you don’t work anymore with them is an essential thing if you want to have new opportunities and possibilities in your life. The second one was a key topic in yesterday’s conference and, even if this seems exciting and greatly stimulating, to be honest i’m a bit scared, but probably this is still part of my italian mentality.

    However, I liked the second article the most, because I found myself a lot in the words of these people. The phrase that represents my situation the most is “I really like what my father did and does, but I don’t want to do its life”. I really appreciate what my father does, since it’s thanks to him that I’m here studying at Unito and I live with my friends here in Turin in a student apartment, but, since he owns a farm, he wakes up really early and sometimes goes to bed really late, and he does this since he was 16. He enjoys his job, but is really hard for him to have some spare time. So I want to enjoy my work like he does, but I also want to have some time to dedicate to other activities, since, like the article says, “we work for livinc, we don’t live for working”. I think that our generation, and especially people that work in IT, have this possibility.

    Leonardo Falcioni
    Participant
    @leonardo
    #1043

    @lorenzobersano The idea of working for living is a correct one, and I came across this important distinction years ago. Still, I think society should evolve in a direction where (possibly) everyone doesn’t see work as the way to live, but as a chance to improve his current life with new experiences. Today most people live work as an obligation towards society or family, while it should be something done only for yourself and not just to pay the rent.

    But of course this is a little utopian, since it’s easier said than done.

    Probably the idea of flexible work is the foundation of this vision.

    Federico Landorno
    Participant
    @federicolandorno
    #1044

    Welcome to all those who have decided to take part in this forum after the intervention of Andrea and Stefano.

    @carlosfilho I agree with you regarding the use of Big Data by the GTT, however, they will put more “Bip machine” and I don’t think the drivers can gather enough informations, GTT will need more and more data and the acquisition process must be automated.
    Certainly the data won’t be only used to suppress the lines but in the future they also will use them in other way.

    @gabrielgatu I think that in Italy the use of a single entrance port isn’t a solution to the problem. Contrary to London, for example, we use more trams and busses than the metro and this generates an overcrowded environment that prevents the implementation of the solution. Without taking into account of incivile people.. At present there are still people who havn’t realized that they have to wait for the passengers get off and then get on.

    Let me see the video and then I’ll try to say my opinion… 🙂

    Filippo Galli
    Participant
    @filippogalli
    #1045

    Wow @gabrielgatu, I think yours is one of the most interesting contributions in this thread. I was not aware of these concerns on a possible bubble popping anytime soon, although I also wandered how it is possible for this new kind of economy to be sustainable. If we think about it,

    • Airbnb is one of the biggest accommodation services and doesn’t own a single house
    • Uber is one of the biggest cab services, and doesn’t own a car
    • Facebook is one of the biggest sources of information, but doesn’t produce any of them
    • same applies for YouTube, and a huge number of web-based services

      Clearly, their value is in the service they offer, but no goods are actually traded. This makes it a very volatile economy, and subject to governmental regulations (think about Uber and Airbnb which are the clearest examples) that can change at any time.

    Andrea Malgaroli
    Participant
    @andreamalgaroli
    #1046

    I totally agree with @gabrielgatu about the GTT topic. I think that we should adopt the efficient solutions of other countries, like UK in public transport. Adopting the english method could bring down ticket price, “forcing” everybody to pay for it. This could also improve the collection of informations, making it more homogeneous and accurate. Finally, with everybody paying the ticket, the public transport company (GTT in our case) will have more money to spend to improve the quality of the service. There are actually a lot of parallels with the tax evasion problem of italy. Stopping the evasion, and oblying everybody to pay taxes, will bring down the social debt and the pressure of taxes, as they will be redistribuited on all the population, not only on a minorance of people. Maybe i rambled a little bit, but this is a topic i really care about.

    Filippo Galli
    Participant
    @filippogalli
    #1049

    I apologize for the awful formatting, I don’t know why I am having problems with the lists. I rewrite my comment here since I also can’t edit my post, apparently.

    Wow @gabrielgatu, I think yours is one of the most interesting contributions in this thread. I was not aware of these concerns on a possible bubble popping anytime soon, although I also wandered how it is possible for this new kind of economy to be sustainable. If we think about it,

    + Airbnb is one of the biggest accommodation services and doesn’t own a single house
    + Uber is one of the biggest cab services, and doesn’t own a car
    + Facebook is one of the biggest sources of information, but doesn’t produce any of them
    + same applies for YouTube, and a huge number of web-based services

    Clearly, their value is in the service they offer, but no goods are actually traded. This makes it a very volatile economy, and subject to governmental regulations (think about Uber and Airbnb which are the clearest examples) that can change at any time.

    Stefano Pistillo
    Participant
    @pistillostefano
    #1050

    Hi guys,

    Thank you for participating to the conference yesterday!
    I wanted to give you a couple of links and comments.

    First of all, I wanted to stress out that you don’t necessarily have to change jobs every 4 years, of course. I’ve been with ClickMail for 7 years now and I’m happy to be here and most importantly I’m still learning new skills every day. I think that’s the point: having space for improvement and being happy. If you are not, why not trying? Why being content? Why is it so easy to be scared about new challenges? Is it because our parents have been telling us (with words or with their attitude) that working can never be fulfilling but just something you have to do 8 hours a day and after that, only after that, the “real” life begins?
    I thought that if I didn’t at least give it a try in my 20’s I would regret it and things are going well so far: I have a fulfilling job, I’m in love with my wife and my 2 daughters – and I even bought a house (talking about stability, right? 🙂 ) – and without having our families helping us out economically, by the way.

    These are the links I told you about new ways of getting a job:
    http://www.linkiesta.it/it/article/2017/03/17/le-aziende-non-cercano-piu-gli-esperti-vogliono-gli-appassionati/33582/
    https://justknock.it/it/index.html

    Finally, a quick note to the Snapchat IPO.
    It’s really difficult to comment, in my opinion: how many people were talking about how the Facebook IPO was a bubble and that it was crazy because it had not make any money, etc.? And now everyone uses it for advertisement.
    From my contacts and friends in the US, it seems to me that the younger generation is not on Facebook but Snapchat, so it may make sense to invest money there if you think that Facebook will be used by us “older” people and Snapchat by our children – especially if the company management seems smart: because as you know, most investors value the people behind an idea almost more than the idea itself, because they’ll be able to shift and pivot towards more successful paths.

    Ciao!
    Stefano

    Andrea Malgaroli
    Participant
    @andreamalgaroli
    #1051

    @gabrielgatu i’m also very interested in the TFR and IPO topics, i’ll watch the videos as soon ad i can. Thanks for all your contributions!

     

    Andrea Malgaroli
    Participant
    @andreamalgaroli
    #1054

    Hi @pistillostefano, thanks for your advices!

    I deeply agree with you that working isn’t necessarely an alienating thing that occupies most of the day. I think that the key to success (and for success i mean doing a job that you like, in a positive environment, achieving goals) is to find something that we like, something that can make us grow not only as workforce but, most importat, as people. As Carlos said previously, we should never stop learning, studying, traveling, meeting new people and of course being open to new challenges. I deeply think that these things are fundamental to grow as a person.

     

    Leonardo Falcioni
    Participant
    @leonardo
    #1055

    @pistillostefano Reading the article about hiring a fan of a particular application or a particular field is something I always thought to be a good idea. This first came to me about movies. There are a lot of directors interpreting a saga or book in certain ways that may be innovative and incredible, but often fall on the little details that a fan can easily spot.

    That’s a silly example, but it can be applied as a concept to everything, I believe.

    About the volatile economy mentioned a lot before, it’s been like this more or less from when banks where founded. A bank doesn’t have all the money of their clients. This makes banks incredibly weak against a possible crisis. If, say, a thousand clients started asking back the money they deposited in their bank account, most banks would fail in a couple of days. That’s very dangerous for society, and it’s neither that improbable (Greece and Italy recently soffered this problem).

    Carlos
    Participant
    @carlosfilho
    #1060

    Wow! I wrote only this morning and now the forum just blew up 😂

    About getting, I agree that we need to automatized things… What was saying is that the way they want to use the data is not functional. Use the data to know how many people are using a bus is difficult… Anyone who uses the public transportation, knows that there are moments where you almost can’t get inside a bus… You get in hoping the door will not smash you… If you count that for each door in a long bus, they will be counting at least 20 people less than the ones that are there… That’s the only thing that I thing will not work… About the drivers, what I meant is that they know the usual times when the bus get overcrowded… So the use of big data in this case will probably be less effective than what they think…

    About mobility, I don’t think a fix job is bad… Probably the way I expressed myself seemed that way… Growing inside a company also is a great thing… I would not like to stay in the same place for all my life… Place of work or also just living in the same country/city…

    @pistillostefano, thanks for the links 😁👍

    I’ll watch the videos later and read again everything… Too much stuff 😁

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