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  • Christian
    Member
    @christianpaesante
    #12641

    Hello everyone! I’ve been quite busy during last week.

    The Virtual SVST was a success for me. It was a great opportunity to listen to people who made it and interact with them, asking questions. Some of the guest which most impacted me were Carola Pescio Canale, when she gave some insights about work life at Dropbox (company organization, product management lifecycle, etc.), Antonella Rubicco, Emilio Billi (which were hard, but I like them a lot!) and Lara Princisvalle which revealed so much humanity and humilty and showed how much she likes to work at Google.

    Antonella Rubicco, Emilio Billi, in particular, offered an “hardcore” but true view of the Silicon Valley, a place full of challenges, a land you have to understand how to “tame”. I liked them a lot because, as I mentioned while ago in the forum, my way to live is to aim for resilience with the need of reactivity to external changes. I think they pointed why pretty well.

    Exchanging ideas and points of view on this forum were helpful and inspiring (so thank you so much to all of you!) and I hope to be able to keep in touch with this community. Since I liked a lot these webinars I’ll probably follow also the ones at September, so probably we’ll hear about each other here again soon!

    I see this experience as a confirmation of my commitment to reach the Silicon Valley or to get in some area in Europe similar to it. Most of the time I felt some of my efforts were worthless, but the Virtual SVST showed me they’ll be meaningful somewhere in the future. Moreover I see this experience as a little “bump” towards it: lot of insights, information, ideas were shared, most of which I’m still processing. For sure, these will be useful in the future and I’m glad to have received them.

    I wish you an happy and proficient summer, see you in September!

    Christian.

    Christian
    Member
    @christianpaesante
    #12623

    Hello everyone!


    @gianluca-pontoni
    , @eleonoracarletti you are lucky! I just started my on-site experience today! I’m currently a backend developer, nothing really “fancy”.

    During quarantine I was charged to build the backend infrastructure of their new product DaScuola which helped students and teacher to overcome difficuties due to Covid-19 and qurantine. Now I’ll work on a new part of their original application, WeStudents, on a new set of features which aims to raise user engagement on the platform through some “games”. It is way more challenging than the first project on DaScuola due to some more complex constraints we need to take into account for good performance optimization. We’ll touch quite interesting topic of scalable architectures to implement some solutions and it will be a good playground to try new patterns and strategies!

    It seems that backend devs are quite a rare resource in WeStudents and moreover not everyone has a deep understanding of distributed architectures. Thanks to my interest in that topic, I’m quite “good” to foresee problems when designing some microservices and I think that’s why during quarantine and now I’m working in tight contact with the CTO of the company Matteo Giardino (he got a Google offer at 18 y/o which refused! Absolute madlad). I really liked the space I had to propose alternative ideas and discuss them when they seemed better. It is sometimes hard to convice him, but I feel it depends on how well you can explain it. This is my really personal experience from my point of view, but that’s what I like of working there.

    A downside is that they’re are really small (like any startup) and you think you need to learn, get mentors, etc. you’ll probably struggle here. I think a startup is a place to have impact, while a big company is a place where you can learn more technically. That’s why I’m still trying to reach some FAANG (and so I recommend you!).

    I highly recommend you to get in contact with them, if you are intererested in working there. It is a really relaxed place, really young (I’m probably one of the older, if not the oldest and I’m only 23), friendly and stimulating. I think they’re still hiring and if you think you’ll need a referral, contact me, I’ll try my best to help you :).

     

    Christian
    Member
    @christianpaesante
    #12606

    Hello everyone!


    @giuliapiesco
    I followed for a bit Uber evolution (which is no more a startup). This was a quite interesting billionare exit but it seems it exited just before the various markets it was operating collapsed. I read an interesting article on this topic: Uber Rise and Fall In One Map.

    Moreover I’m following WeStudents the startup I started working with during quarantine. Their size is still quite small, but that’s what I like of it. Being small, you don’t have time for everything and you have to concentrate on things that make the biggest impact. Moreover being small, let your actions have direct consequences on what the company is accomplishing which is really rewarding and motivating.

    I never googled it, but i think the difference between startup and scaleup is in its name: startup is a company which just started its business and is still trying to find the best market fit, often pivoting some times. A scale up is a consolidated business idea which now needs to scale in order to be profitable.
    Typically a startup becomes a scaleup at a certain point otherwise it fails, but often it depends on the business model.

    Regards!

    Christian

    Christian
    Member
    @christianpaesante
    #12593

    Hello everyone!

    I don’t think future workplaces will dramatically change. I think remote and on-site work will become more balanced. That because I read that several people can’t separate work hours from private life, hence they like to move outside of they’re home or go into the office. Moreover, some of the offices in the tech world are built to encourage cooperation between coworkers.

    On the other hand, working remotely let people gain more free-time and flexibility and there are a good amout of supportes of remote/smart working.

    I think that in places where smart working wasn’t used before the pandemic, the company will offer more flexibility and opportunity of the workers to work from home. Some companies even realized how an office can be an huge cost. So I think offices will become smaller and remote work will be encouraged.

    Let me know what you think!

    Christian
    Member
    @christianpaesante
    #12585

    Hello everyone!

    I liked Carola talk! She was very inspiring and confirmed some of my thoughts and desires.

    In particular she stressed about finding a job you like. That was something I luckily realized very soon, but I was questioning myself if it was really important considering all the efforts I was putting in. Carola showed how it can pays off and to keep fighting to get what you want.

    I also liked when she metioned how doing something that feels creative or that feels you are creating something is one of the most rewarding things and makes you feel realized. I remember from high school the ancient poetry “The Lamb” we studied in the English Literature. The core concept of the work was the “power of the creation” that the poet was describing. The poet thought that this was same power shared from God in creating its child and by the poet when creating a poetry. The author was telling how he felt this power was raising him to something bigger.

    Religion apart, I think creating something is the key to be satisfied at the end of the day and it’s what drives us to wake up every day. I also found this in software: creating something out of nothing but your mind is something beautiful.

    What else drives and motivates you everyday?

    Christian
    Member
    @christianpaesante
    #12571

    Hello everybody!

    Do you think that an early experience abroad has a different impact on the person you are, with respect to experience at an older age?”

    I think so, when you’re young you’re more willing to be enthusiast about new concepts, ideas and way of thinking and act. Thus, you are more willing to understand, change and absorb everything of a new culture. Of course due to lack of experience, you may get some ideas that does not really work and gaining experience you prune what is important from what is not. On the other hand with an older age you are more biased on your experience and you are less open to change your ideas. So is important to make new experiences now than later.

    Regarding the question of @mstrocchi: “what would you do if you family can’t guarantee you the economical opportunity to take that risk? Would you start your own startup still or would you work for a few years?”, I think the answer is few posts before when @matteo30 mentioned “Do what you can, with what you have, where you are” (Theodore Roosevelt).

    I think about money as a medium. Few years ago I read a quote on Quora regarding a question like this: “How much money do you have to make in order to feel free?”. The quote in a reply was: “You won’t feel free if you make 500.000$ on Wall Street, but your boss makes 1 million and the boss of your boss makes 5 million”.
    So the brief explaination is that money are like a fluid: it comes and it goes. If you need money, you’ll find a way to get some. The important is enjoying what you are doing and what you are.

    So my reply to @mstrocchi question is: if my family won’t be able to take that risk, I’ll just find the economical support elsewhere whether it is a less expensive-starting business, an investor or a 9-to-5 job to raise the capital I need. I’ll find another way. It won’t be wasy, of course, but everyone of us is capable to do it.

    Christian
    Member
    @christianpaesante
    #12559

    Hello everyone!

    Today talk was awesome, mostly because Lara’s age is really close to us and her career wasn’t still so long and successful like the previous speakers which made her a little closer to our world.

    Regarding @parro question: for my point of view, was always “simple”. The only limit for me is the 24h length of the day 8h of which require me to sleep. My “strategy” is “everything in its own time”.

    I generally don’t schedule my commitments on a week basis but on an accademic year basis. With this I can see over the year the periods where I’m just concentrated in studying and the ones where I totally free (lesson suspended after exams) or almost free (when I have lessons but it’s not necessary to study since exams are too far).

    The only constraints I have are: priority to the university and all exams passed on the first call. I generally need 2 weeks per week for each subject and that means that 4 months per year I’m busy in studying. This leaves a lot of room.
    Summer is completely free and 3 weeks after the winter call exams are again free. The rest of the year is partially busy with lessons.

    Everything I want to accomplish, try, investigate, deepen or understand I do it during the time I don’t have to study or follow lessons.

    I found it really powerful because in this way you can plan in the long term, even on more years (I remember me doing this when I was at the second year of university). And I didn’t struggle at all to get results. Exams grade are still good enough (average upper that 25), while at the same time I grow more than I would just by focusing entirely on university.

    Sometimes I found myself even working in the evening on some project or technology, but that’s completely ok. If I’m working, I’m growing. If I’m growing, I’m happy!

    Christian
    Member
    @christianpaesante
    #12543

    Hello everyone!


    @daniel-romano
    I think that nothing is forever. Current relationship may not be the same in 5 years and most importantly the family you have now in your 20s won’t be the same in your 30s when maybe you’ll plan to have a child. For sure, I’ll choose career and ambitions. It’s not that I don’t care about people around me but speaking in the long term, the most important person in my life in the future will be my son or my daughter to which I hope I will be able to give the same (or even better) opportunities my parents gave me.
    You have the best career opportunities in your 20s and 30s not in your 50s or 60s, so the time to take drastic decisions is now, not later.

    Since nothing last forever, none can tell that I’m not able to spend the next 5 years in the Silicon Valley far from my family, friends and girlfriend and then come back to Italy and still do something great here thanks to the know-how I wouldn’t be able to gain anywhere else. As @mstrocchi said it’s not that hard to afford a round trip to Italy in an high income-high standard of living area even now and then.

    We live in a connected and fast changing world. I think we should consider as “home” our entire planet, instead of just a restricted region, our relatives and friends are just behind the corner.

    Christian
    Member
    @christianpaesante
    #12532

    Hello everyone!

    Yesterday’s talk was amazing! Expecially Andrea Vaccaro experience in Hyperloop. I read about the project a couple of years ago and knowing one of the first persons working in that company was great!

    Regarding the topic raised by @daniel-romano, there are a lot of examples of “corporate/company culture”. I think is really important and underestimated in companies in Italy. I feel it is similar to a philosophy of existence of the company itself, a set of values chosen to grant success, growth and well-being inside the company. It’s not only a set of internal rules but depends also on the product the company is trying to create. If it is something amazing and innovative people are more attracted to work on it (like Andrea Vaccaro told us when he read about Hyperloop One’s mission). So, I would say it’s a combination of product innovation, cultural values and economical treatment (including bonuses and equities).

    Personally, I don’t consider economical treatment with much importance: I generally require it is at least in the average for that position in that zone.
    As cultural values I generally prefer an informal environment where people are not micromanaged and where they can spend a little portion of their time in other project they like inside the company (in Google this is around 20% of their time). This help people to keep interest in the company, bringing new ideas inside the company and in the end making workers happier! Everything else, like a fancy office with a gym and such, it’s cool but totally not necessary for the happiness and motivation of the employees.

    Another important thing for me is the degree of ownership I have on the product I’m working on. If I’m not able to put my touch on it to make it the best possible, I simply feel useless and I feel that my time there is not worth the money I’m paid, because I can’t be motivated. Ownership is something you develop when you have some order of freedom in decision making and design, without it everything I’m doing is boring.

    The best leader I had was probably the CTO of the last company I worked in: WeStudents. Despite being younger than me, he put me in the condition to bring new ideas and being responsible while he was ensuring to keep the course. Most of the time was spent together validating my designs and he was just there to ensure I was matching the company goals.
    One of Amazon’s 14 leadership principles is “Hire and Develop the Best. […] Leaders develop leaders and take seriously their role in coaching others. […]“. Leaders develop leaders, that’s exactly what he was doing. He put me in the conditions to lead the project while still ensuring the quality of it.

    Looking forward to see other opinions!

    Christian
    Member
    @christianpaesante
    #12518

    Hello everyone!

    We had two awesome talks in the past days!

    I liked a lot Emilio Billi and Antonella Rubicco’s speech. It was somewhat rude/brutal, but it the most important lesson in life: if you want something you have to prove you deserve it or you have to take it. I personally disagree @katia-palma. Taking into account the person’s personality leads to introduce bias in decision making and reduce meritocracy. Of course you cannot treat people like things, but in a business/working enviroment if you want to realize the best product you have to hire/work with the best talents. Of course if one of those talents is not capable to behave with team mates or creates problems (have a bad personality) will be fired or not hired (the “Googleyness” mentioned by Luca Prasso).

    I think that measuring performances of people in a working environment is the right thing to do. Everyone can have drawbacks or bad periods of course, but this avoid to promote someone simply because “he’s funny” or he’s more emotionally closer to me.

    For example Google has a very strict performance evaluation where your promotion is not dictated by your manager (with which you can be best friends), but from a serie of reviews from peers and other metrics. Another example of this is the recruitment process as described by Luca Prasso. This examples also apply to every high tech company.

    I think it’s crucial. This ensure fairness and avoid that horrible situation where you see your lazy coworker being promoted because he covered his messes smartly all the time. This also put the responsibility of your failures only on you. And it’s wonderful because if you fail you know where to look at to understand what went wrong in order to improve and grow!

    I think that a failure must be always a contemplated possibility. The game is to avoid it at all costs. Until you fail. And when you fail, it’s just like crashing a rocket: beautiful to see for others and full of information for you. Just stop a moment, reverse engineer, extract informations and learn. We grew from trial and error after all!

    I have just other few thoughts about Renzo Piano’s words mentioned by @sal0hc1n: “They have to leave, but out of curiosity, not desperation“. Unfortunately, I don’t think it’s really possible to not have a minimum of desperation. As Andrea Baldini said in his recent talk for SVST, in the last few decades Italy growth was flat which also means that less and less new opportunities was born. Most historical Italian companies moved their legal office outside of here and basically we are just a market and not a land with value in terms of innovation and know-how.

    I think it’s really hard to find the right opportunities here to really grow and somehow I feel like Luca Prasso when he was saying that in the 80’s there weren’t companies in Italy in the field of computer graphic. I think that my opinion is highly biased from the fact that I’m in the tech field and I consider as a reference high tech companies. I don’t find any Italian company with similar know-how and internal culture where I can really grow as fast as I was doing in my first experiences. Moreover, I had a “bad” experience in one of the companies I interned in the past, in terms of “hierarchies” and possibility get involved and prove my value and I’m kinda scared of getting hired here by a company which is not a startup.

    Of course I’d love to launch a company here, where I can help people full of talent to grow, but I also want to be as technological innovative as the FAANGs. That’s why I first want to see everything I can from the inside.

    Is there any company you consider the one from which everyone should learn?

    Let me know, if my opinions are too “catastrofic” and if you see a real potential here!

    • This reply was modified 4 years ago by Christian.
    Christian
    Member
    @christianpaesante
    #12469

    Hi everyone!

    Despite being really busy from University, I finally found some time to enter in some of the discussion arose in these days!

    “INTELLIGENCE and resourcefulness are the keys to succeed in life. ALWAYS.”, I strongly agree with that idea. I personally believe that everyone equally has an strong human potential and I feel that, more than intelligence, determination is the key factor for all kinds of success. For example some athlete doesn’t need a particular dose of intelligence, but what will grant him to win is how much effort, dedication and focus he put in his training. Intelligence, speed, strength are all feature that you gain working on yourself, but determination is something in you that you must have in order to improve the previous ones.

    Personally, I found that determination was what allowed me to keep growing in the past years and get close to the world of the Big Tech and get an interview for a Software Engineer position in a selective company such as Amazon. Over the course of my growth (which of course is still not complete) I became more intelligent as well. I see wisdom, intelligence and smartness as related but different things:

    Wisdom for me is the pure knowledge

    Intelligence is the capacity to leverage your knowledge in order to take the best action in front of a problem

    Smartness is the capacity to leverage the environment at your advantage without requiring a proper knowledge (some sort of “instict”)

    Of course you must have the right mix of the three to achieve what you want. For example solving a complex technical problem may require more wisdom and intelligence, while for an entrepreneur intelligence and smartness are more important even if you don’t have a big wisdom.

    For the entrepreneur case I see as smartness as the crazyness mentioned by @sal0hc1n, but I feel that crazyness is something more related to illogical actions rather than risky actions with the purpose to leverage the environment at your advantage. So, from my point of view an entrepreneur will always put reason in his actions in order to foresee consequences, environment changes and problems and to avoid crashing into them only when they arise.

    For this last point I have an example. During Q1 and Q2 of 2018 Tesla encountered big problems into the production of the Model 3, the car that should have put Tesla in a profitable situation. Deliveries were constantly delayed and production rates were constantly unsatisfied. Tesla stocks were crashing and the company was burning hundred of milions of dollars. Apparently, the strong automation of production pipeline wasn’t perfect and the production was constantly blocking. Since there wasn’t a proper way to fix the problems easily without stopping the production, Musk decided to put a giant tent aside of the factory and create a production pipeline with less automation, all with “minimal resources”.

    For me that’s a clear example of smartness. The factory already had the production machines, but the integration between them was the problem. The “simplest” thing to do was to reduce complexity for a provisional reduced teorical maximum production rate, in order to start the production and in the meanwhile solve the problems. All of this without requiring big additional expenses. And it worked. He leveraged the factory situation of that moment at his advantage in order to fulfill the expectations.

    Another important thing for an entrepreneur (and in general everyone) is the capability to handle pressure and stress, more in general emotions. A cold mind reasons better and helps us make better choices. I think it is a key to achieve resilience and resilience is what allows anyone to keep his momentum even in the most difficult situations, don’t getting cracked by them and in the end being successful. I think resilience is the most valuable skill, also in every-day life.

    What do you think? Do you think a particular mindset could really help you in life?

     

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 1 month ago by Christian.
    • This reply was modified 4 years, 1 month ago by Christian.
    • This reply was modified 4 years, 1 month ago by Christian.
    Christian
    Member
    @christianpaesante
    #12440

    Hello everyone!

    My name is Christian Paesante and I’m attending the first year of the Master in Data Science and Engineering at PoliTo, after having graduated in Computer Engineering at the same university.

    From the first year at PoliTo I started integrating my studies with personal projects and internships. Learning on my own programming languages first and large scale architecture patterns later, I really got passionate in Software Engineering.

    Two years ago in fact I started a project based on microservices, but the hardest thing I found was to find people with which exchange ideas on that topic and to find companies in Italy that deals with that technology. I’m really obsessed with the infrastructural quality of the products big tech companies offers, the scale at which they can operate and the engineering culture inside of them. I really wanted to see from the inside the state-of-the-art technology of some products we use everyday, as well as the complexity, difficulties and the organization that there’s around them.

    With this in mind I landed an interview at Amazon at November, but it didn’t end successfully and the time there was too short to ask very technical questions to the recruiters. When I read about the Silicon Valley Tour, I thought this could be good chance to meet really interesting people which are from/worked in that area, ask a lot of questions, learn a lot from them and try to take part the tour and visit the “Dreamland” of every Software Engineer.

    Christian Paesante

    Christian
    Member
    @christianpaesante
    #12151

    Hello everyone! Hope you’re all fine and safe!

    As I mentioned some days ago, big companies are still hiring. I can confirm that at least they’re still interviewing! One of us got an interview at Amazon today (not me, he will tell it probably when the recruiter will follow up), so I take again the opportunity to encourage you to apply. It’s cheap and could end up with a life-time opportunity!

    Regarding open-source I had few experience too, both actively and passively. In the last company I interned, they were using ColdFusion by Adobe as a tool to develop their product. It is a really old tool and rumors say Adobe it’s planning to terminate its support. So my actual task during my internship was to experiment a migration of their product from ColdFusion to an open-source equivalent called Lucee. Doing it, I found open-source as a user is good until there’s a community. Indeed, Lucee’s documentation was really poor and the tool in general was not really mature. The company behind it was providing support on a charge, but due to the fact the project wasn’t really hyped progress where slow and hard to achieve.

    On the other hand there are plenty of tool I use every day that are open-source and are working well because there is a huge community behind it which likes it. I take as an example Docker mentioned by Andrea Scianò. The project born open-source and Docker Inc. was developing a paid product called Docker Swarm used to orchestrate Docker containers. But Docker containers became so successful that a lot of other tools open-source (e.g. Kubernetes) were built around it and Docker Inc. ended up not having enough room to grow its paid product! Probably there were some mistakes in the company strategy and business model, but that company had an huge potential. To understand better: Docker containers are currently the reference in containerization supported in big cloud providers such as GCP (Google), AWS (Amazon) and Azure (Microsoft).

    As I said I had also an active (but limited) experience in open-source. I think knowledge must be free, you should only sell products. I mentioned in my introduction about a microservice project that took me the last two years of free time. The aim of it is to build a restaurant reservation service, similar to TheFork, cheaper (up to 8 times, but probably its too much :D) and with a full-fledged management system for the restaurant. But I wanted it auto-scalable from day-1. That was an unnecessary constraint I choose in order to learn (almost) everything I needed in systems design as a backend engineer. I wanted it to be at the same time a business opportunity (in the long term) and a opportunity to learn what PoliTo wasn’t teaching me.

    That explain why its 2 years I’m working on it: I had to study A LOT and solve lots of funny problems. Eventually I finished to design my architecture and implemented most of it on AWS. The process was so difficult to complete that I felt it was too much worth it to keep it only for me. The concepts I used were ramping up, so I wrote 3 articles on Medium explaining it in details from theory to AWS.
    If you want to read them, here you have them Event Sourcing + CQRS: from theory to AWS — part 1, part 2 and part 3.
    I also released a package on NPM which provides an implementation of some of the components mentioned in the article that since its publication reached a total of 2400+ downloads. Unfortunately, I implemented it for my needs on the first hand and its not really production-ready, so downloads per week didn’t grew overtime.

    Again, sorry for the long post.

    Christian
    Member
    @christianpaesante
    #12135

    Hello everyone! Hope you’re all fine and safe!

    Unfortunately, I couldn’t participate in yesterday meeting. I was working and there was too much stuff to do that I couldn’t postpone. If @paolomarenco will upload it in the future, as it happened with @pistillostefano talk, it would be highly appreciated!

    <span class=”handle-sign”>@</span>paologioelebrucia I took a look to the article you mentioned and was really amazing. My background doesn’t allow me to understand it in a global picture and indeed I find there are still some issues when it come to apply the principle as a general economy, but I still think the potential and the goals are good! Indeed, I always thought that the governament is not able to solve all the problems its country has, primarly due to its inefficiencies in terms of missing regulations or regulations that avoid it to take tempestive actions, but that are required to prevent other problems such as corruption (it’s pretty complex to explain in details). That made me think that there should be some big company (that makes profit as a normal company makes) but it funds a controlled foundation which operates to solve social problems, such as vagrancy by providing free heated dormitories during the winter for example.

    Unfortunately this requires that the main shareholders of the profitable company have the willing to do it and I always thought almost nobody had this interest. So, your article changed my perspective on this. Despite of thinking that Social Business is something that we desperately need in the near future, I don’t think it can be applied as a general rule. For instance, technological development exists when exists competition and competition exists when there are some rewards that leaders are aiming to achieve (that in our current economy model is profit). Within the Social Business concept, I think there’s a lack of this reward, hence there’s no development/progress. Or maybe there is, only when problems appear.
    I don’t know, I’m sure I’m missing something. If someone can provide more insights on this, I’ll really appreciate!

    By the way, I recently read some interesting articles which highlight even more current problems of our economy on Medium.com. This is an awesome platform with very good contents. Here some: Prepare for the Ultimate Gaslighting (this one is really good), This is How an Economy Dies.

    Obviously these articles takes into consideration USA situation, but they are still very good.

    By the way, for those of you interested in AI, I’ll definetly recommend you Two Minutes Papers. As it says this channel posts very short videos (less than 5 minutes long) about paper work of AI researchers some of which are really amazing! This is the one I found really impressive: This AI Learned to Summarize Videos.

    Another video I want to share with you is about a channel some of you shared here: Lex Fridman. The video is Consciousness is Not a Computation (Roger Penrose). In this video Roger Penrose (for those of you which took some advanced algebra course, he is the same guy of the Moore-Penrose pseudoinverse) talks about what consciusness could be and where it could reside.

    Something that characterize me is to not question myself on topics that aren’t scientifically treatable and do not have a real impact on reality. Up to that video consciousness is was one of those topics. I always believed in a concept of soul/consciousness, but since it had not a scientific definition or scientific evidence on where to search it, question my self on where it is, wasn’t really worth my time. Too many hypotesis, but zero evidences. That video radically changed my idea about consciouness by providing some scientific hints on how it could be described and found.

    Sorry for the long post!

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 2 months ago by Christian.
    • This reply was modified 4 years, 2 months ago by Christian.
    Christian
    Member
    @christianpaesante
    #12111

    Hello everyone! Hope you’re all fine and safe!

    Yesterday I was checking job opportunities from FAANGs as I periodically do. I bumped into a full-time position at Amazon in NYC which was added the same day on LinkedIn. Then in the “suggested opportutinities”, I found other 6 job posting from Amazon for SWE positions in NYC all added in the last week. From my perspective that sounded completely unusual for the time period in the year and for COVID-19. After googling a bit, I found this article of Business Insider: “Big tech companies hired aggressively during the last financial crisis, and they’re doing it again.”.

    Suddenly words of @pistillostefano came into my mind, when he said “I don’t know why, but during crisis in 2009 companies from Silicon Valley were hiring with an accelerating trend”. Currently there’s an overall reduction of job vacancies, while FAANGs are still hiring. But maybe we could expect in tech a similar situation to the one described by Stefano in 2009 once lockdowns will start to loosen up and the economy will restart to grow. This is pure speculation, but who knows… We’ll see.

    So eyes open on months to come and apply!

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